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for leaking documents to a news agency, which could set a precedent. defense attorneys are set to make their closing remarks today. the senate appropriations committee has voted to sanction any country that aids nsa whistleblower edward snowden. the panel mass the measure by unanimous consent. it calls on the state department to work with congress to level sanctions against any extradition. he is holed up in russia where he is reportedly been granted asylum. the oil giant halliburton has agreed to plead guilty to destroying evidence following the 2010 oil spill in the gulf of mexico. under the plea deal, heliborne will pay the maximum fine and remain on probation for three years. federal prosecutors have saciled charges against capital for alleged securities fraud and wire fraud. hundreds of millions of dollars in profits were down for the firm and its owner stephen cohen for more than a decade. preet bharara, the u.s. attorney for the southern district of new york said that the scheme is unprecedented in size for a hedge fund. >> when so many people from a single hedge fund have engag
purpose. we take our department of defense and we hold them to a very tight account. we don't let them spend money without a contract, without reviews by the inspector general, reviews by our committee. but here's $2.6 billion unspecified. oh, mr. car decide, use it wisely. -- cars eyed, use it wisely. >> i reserve the remaining time. >> claim time in opposition. mr. womack: afghan national forces includes the national afghan army and police and been one of the united states' top priorities since operations began in afghanistan in 2001. the purpose of the afghan national force development program is to grow the capacity and capability of the afghan national security force in line with international agreements. this year's request totals $7.7 billion. the request is in the categories of defense forces, interior forces and detainee operations. included within the categories is sustainment to conduct day-to-day operations totaling $5 billion and enablelers that my friend refers to and says that if i heard him correctly that we don't know what these enablers are. we doe no what they are. a
? >> well, the prosecutor prosecutor plays a role along with the defense in making recommendations to the jury -- to the judge with respect to the jury charge. and to the extent this charge could have been presented in a more plain and understandable fashion, the entire system bears responsibility for that. >> thanks to my legal panel. coming up, juror b29 said zimmerman got away with murder. now calls to change the stand your ground law are getting louder. >>> plus, why attorney general eric holder may be bringing his voting rights fight to north carolina. and bill o'reilly and the right continued the desperate push to change the conversation on race from rap music to chicago violence to preaching about the black family, anything but race. >> the reason there is so much violence and chaos in the black precincts is the disintegration of the african-american family. >> i'll show you what is behind the desperation. >>> and friend or foe, i want to know. e-mail me at reply al. it's coming up. i'm a careful investor. when you do what i do, you think about risk. i don't like the ups and
, the government, says yes. the defense says look at things like that video. it's all about embarrassing the government. manning was disillusioned with the war, he was troubled by what he saw like the matter in that video, and he wanted the public to know what was going on. that's the defense's case. the prosecution sees it very differently. >> is manning really looking at 136 years in prison, or in the end, could it really be a much shorter time? >> reporter: well, that would be the maximum. you know, there is an interesting wrinkle in that question, because the judge has already said she will knock off about 112 days off any sentence he gets because of the time he served at a military prison here in the washington area in which he was held in solitary confinement, stripped naked. the government again said that was because he was a suicide risk. the judge found suicide risk or not, that was not the correct or appropriate condition for him to be held in, so she's already going to take time off for that. i think the issue is the government will go for the maximum, and the defense will hav
. the clerk: a bill making appropriations for the department of defense for the fiscal year ending september 30, 2014, and for other purposes. the chair: when the committee of the whole rose on tuesday, july 23, 2013, amendment number 66 printed in house report 113- 170 offered by the gentlewoman from hawaii, ms. hanabusa, had been disposed of. pursuant to clause 6 of rule 12, proceedings will now resume on amendments printed in house report 113-170 on which further proceedings were postponed in the following order. amendment number 48 by mr. jones of north carolina. amendment number 51 by mr. lamalfa of california. amendment number 55 by mr. mulvaney of south carolina. amendment number 60 by mr. stockton of texas. amendment number 62 by mrs. walorski of indiana. amendment number 65 by ms. bonamici of oregon. the chair will reduce to two minutes the time for each electronic vote in this series. the unfinished business is the request for a recorded vote on amendment number 48 printed in house report 113-170 offered by mr. the gentleman from north carolina, mr. jones, on which further proceedi
. >>> today's producer pick could be a tv ad for a self-defense class, a thief messes with the wrong woman. a thief in russia thought he picked an easy target when he tried to grab a woman's cell phone. wait until you see how she fought back. she fought back leaving him flopping on the floor and then she walked away with her phone and all of her stuff. you can check out more by heading to thomas roberts facebook page. crime does not pay. >>> breaking news unfolding in new jersey. a small united express flight just made an emergency landing at newark international airport in new jersey due to smoke somewhere in the plane. there's currently a groundstop at the airport. it's not clear at this point how many people are on board. we'll bring you updates as we get them. turning to florida now the not guilty verdict in the george zimmerman trial is putting a new spotlight on the case of a woman sentenced to 20 years in prison for firing a warning shot into the air. for more than one year marisa alexander has been sitting in prison after a jury found her guilty of aggravated assault. she used the
of defense and the secretaries of all of the armed forces groups, got together to honor the veterans of the korean war. it was a sight to see so many korean veterans from so many different parts of the country. and they were reminded by our president that we had been labeled as those who participated in what was referred to as the forgotten war. because most all of the world knew about the importance of america being involved in saving emocracy in world war ii and vietnam. good or bad, people knew people that went there. but somehow in the middle of that, no one really missed us or knew where korea was or didn't appear that there was too much concern. d when we did return, unlike the vietnam veterans who really unfairly had been treated so unkind, fortunately for us, we were never missed except by our family and friends, people never they here we were and to us. weren't as kind veterans turned out from all over. comrades that were part of the 20 countries that were part of the united nations. and when north koreans invaded south korea, those of us who were called to go to south korea
, a black man who used self defense to kill at the time a 16-year-old white kid he said was charging him, hadn't been hit, but shot him in self defense, and he was acquitted, the black man. what about that one? it is the same exact thing. opposite of trayvon martin. >> they're not following that case, that's the difference. >> so the president follows the press? >> i think it is fair to say every white house in one way or another follows the news cyclee concept. i hope not. >> well, it is a little difficult to get out from underneath the news cycle in an overwhelming story. dana i think would agree, it is difficult to see if -- >> i think to talk about it later, but the initial comment -- >> hold on. what i am saying is the president chose that trayvon martin case to get involved in. the press wasn't implicating the white house or tying it to the white house, calling the white house racist by any means. he is the one brought himself in it. >> i don't think there's a black man in america that doesn't feel the frustration of being tagged and i think he wanted to say it. wanted to try to ex
as assistant secretary of defense for international security policy and deputy assistant secretary for nuclear forces and arms control policy. he received a bachelor's degree from georgetown and a masters in international study from johns hopkins school of advanced international studies. the floor is yours. served in this body for senator jackson, who many of you had a non-and memorable memory of, i'm sure. >> i recognize i am in the distinct minority on this panel, but i take comfort that i represent the vast majority of americans and certainly the vast majority of those of you in congress on this question. should gitmo be closed? the answer is resoundingly no there is a- unless better alternative available. i would like to put this into context if i may. it is to explain why we have gitmo in the first place. it is because we are at war. is seemingly lost on a lot of us as we talk about this in an abstract context. removed fromhow be this overarching problem. we are not just at warp. we are at war because others attacked us and, in your wisdom wisdom, and the congress you gave the to fight ba
experience, and largely saw the confrontation through his eyes and the way the defense portrayed it. but she couldn't identify with trayvon martin's female friend who what haitian-american. so that term creepy-ass cracka that rachel jeantel said trayvon used, you're saying that's simply how they talked to each other? >> sure. that's the way they talk. >> and did you see that as a negative statement or a racial statement as the defense suggested? >> i don't think it's really racial. i think it's just everyday life, the type of life that they live and how they're living and the environment that they're living in. >> so you didn't find her credible as a witness? >> no. >> so juror b-37 was part of a six-member panel. all female, one african-american. one of our guests said the trial was over when the jury was seated. do you think that's a fair statement? and more broadly, is racial bias built into the system? let's talk about it with sunny hostin, jeffrey toobin, jose baez, julie blackman is a jury consultant in the martha stewart case. robert horshorn, jury consultant and defense attorney mark
. >> laura: joining us now from w. reaction two criminal defense attorneys from new york stacy snyder and from davey, florida, regina tombinascus. it's great to see both of you. that got everybody talking yesterday that's for sure this juror speaking out. regina, let's talk with you. we heard from that other juror b-37 who she thought both men could have stepped back. that both were responsible but that she believed that zimmerman had a right to defend himself. now this juror comes forward and says zimmerman got away with, quote: murder, but then goes on to say we reached the right verdict. can you say get away with murder and reached the right verdict? >> yes, you can actually, because there is no question that trayvon was killed by george zimmerman. the issue was whether or not it was self-defense or not. and these jurors had that question posed to them. they had the law. fanned they thought there was nord reasonable doubt there this was murder they should have spoken up in the jury room. not weeks later after media attacks their. system we agree to live by. >> laura: i don't like t
has a bright line. it says if you engage in a wongful action, there is a defense called the insanity defense which never works as most of us know because we don't recognize it. should we recognize it, that's an interesting question. should we have a more robust concept of diminished responsibility in light of the understanding that some people have less control over their preferences and desires or should we have better sentencing schemes or get rid of incarceration and come up with different models of trying to deal with punishment once we understand people have wrong selections. i think those are all interesting questions, but is there free will? well, the fact that almost everybody in the audience raised either their right or left hand contemplated it and were quickly able to act and respond. that to me says, yes, there is. now what do we want to do about it? now that we understand that those of us in the audience or up here that like chocolate cake may not have control over it, how do we want to account for that if at all in the criminal justice system? to date, we haven't. in th
killer but also a pedophile. the former prosecutor, criminal defense attorney and some real characters that we're all being introduced to in this trial. dan, you first. i'm wondering about the testimony from the so-called rifleman. how damaging is that do you think to the defense? >> in terms of the actual charges that whitey bulger is facing, it's not that damaging. murder charges are going to be proved. there's overwhelming evidence. however, this case is unusual. it seems like the defense is more focused on stopping the prosecution from proving things that ruin his reputation like he's a rat or kills women or he's a pedophile and in that sense, that means a lot to the defense. in terms of whether he'll be convicted of murder, it probably won't make a difference. rick: what do you think of that point, the defense strategy here? could this be some kind of a preventative strategy before this guy goes to prison? >> definitely. i think they've had the conversation and bulger has told his attorneys, look. i'm going down. i know i'm going to prison but i at least need to be protected. i ca
, let me get to you react to what mark o'mara, the defense attorney for george zimmerman posted a little while ago, while juror b-29 is a model juror. "people may disagree with self-defense laws but a juror's job is not to decide what a law should be, her job is to apply the facts presented at trial to the laws they are instructed about. this is the eence of what we seek in a juror, the at to use one as common sense, apply the law to the facts, agree not to be swayed by sympathy or emotion, no matter how loudly it's argued by the prosecutors and decide a lawful and fair verdict." do you agree that juror b-29 was a, quote, model juror? >> well, i don't know if she was a model juror or not. i certainly think that she approached the process in good faith. i don't think there's any reason to doubt that she did that. but i think jeffrey makes a good point. what is really clear when we hear this juror speak is that she really misunderstood the law. she did not appropriately apply the law to the facts because she didn't understand it. and the reason why she didn't understand it could be because
, the department of defense at the top of the list, in making sure that those dollars go to american companies. but there are circumstances in which the buy-american provisions are waived. there are a number of ways that you can waive those provisions, but it's important for us to have full transparency and disclosure when the department of transportation and when fhwa is considering awarding a major project funded by american taxpayers to a foreign company. you see, when the buy-american statute is waived the requirement that american material be used is null and void. and so what this bill says is that when the fhwa provides public notice that they are considering waiving the buy-america clause for a particular project, that they include in that public notice a consideration of the impact on american jobs. it's worth knowing whether a waiver is simply going to result in the loss of ten american jobs or the loss of 500 american jobs, and this amendment very simply says that when a waiver to the buy-america law is pending, that we should know from the department of transportation and from fhwa
. a black teenager shot dead after a white gunman claiming defense opens fire on him and his friends. anderson talks to the dead boy's parents. later, what anthony weiner's sexting partner has to say about the man, what she wants to say to his wife and what the voters have to say about it all. we begin, though, with the zimmerman juror b29, the only nonwhite juror, her name is maddie, the one holdout, at least for a while. she says she owes trayvon martin's family an apology, because she ultimately had no choice but to acquit a man she calls a murderer. she spoke to abc's robin roberts. the interview aired on abc's "world news." >> what was your first vote? >> my first vote was second degree murder. >> second degree murder? >> it was hard. a lot of us wanted to find something bad, something that we could connect to the loss. for myself, he's guilty because the evidence shows he's guilty. >> he's guilty of? >> killing trayvon martin. but as the law was read to me, if you have no proof that he killed him intentionally, you can't say he's guilty. >> did you want to step out at all? >> i
defense of the united states and think of those channels. think of those challenges that they met. are we so small that we can only look at our facebook likes today in this chamber? or are we going to stand up and find out how many lives we can save. let us get back to the big politics of protecting america and moving america forward. soundly reject this amendment, let's do this right on the authorization bill. the chair: the gentleman's time has expire. the gentleman from florida reserves. mr. young: i reserve. the chair: the gentleman from ichigan is recognized. mr. amash: i yield two minute -- one minute to the gentleman from michigan, mr. conyers. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. conyers: ladies and gentlemen of the house, this amendment will not stop the proper use of the patriot act and fisa authorities to conduct terrorism and intelligence investigations. i've never block -- i'd never block that. all this amendment is intended ongoing to curtail the dragnet collection and storage of the personal records of innocent americans. it does not defund the n.s.a.
and today on "studio b," a former military prosecutor, who is now a defense attorney, told me the government has not convicted somebody of aiding the enemy since 1917. >> that was is essentially a case where somebody was disclosing information because they wanted americans to be killed. they wanted the enemy to have this information. and, in this case, i think the government just was not able to prove that pfc manning intentionally disclosed this to the enemy. >> shepard: manning supporters demonstrated outside othe courthouse today they see him as the whistle blower, a hero, not a criminal. so do lawyers who just called him naive with good intentions. manning admits he did give wikileaks more than 700,000 documents. prosecutors claim he knew al qaeda would see that information on that, prosecutors for the government lost completely. catherine herridge is on fox top story in the courthouse in fort mead in maryland. what happened in the courtroom today, catherine. >> late today the a.p. picked up comments from the defense indicating that they really felt today's verdict was a significant win
a travesty. >> mid win, if you are the defense, what do you do to separate this son from this father? >> what i would do is focus on the son and build him up as a person, and get the jury to understand what kind of person this man is. he's a young person, and i think jury oftentimes feel several thinkic for a defendant who is really, really young. i found that tape to be shocking, saying he doesn't understand why people are so persistent that this is a murder. i think it's the best way to try this case. >> it was chilling to hear the father talk about that like that. joshua young is 17 years old right now. he was 15 when the murder was committed. his appearance, he does seem so incredibly young. that is what the jury will be looking at. a very young man, but how much of the father will they see in the trial? how much of that other image, heather, is likely to get into their heads? >> that's what the prosecution is going to have to do. plaintiffs a suppression hearing to keep out of the some of the statements of josh young. it would be interesting if he admitted to some participation, it will
for managing park concessionaires so much of model used by the defense department and its base exchanges and recreational facilities and to pursue bonding and revolving loans. i would like to mention fenty the significant impact of sequestration from the budgetary cuts to the national park service and its related bureaus. sequestration was designed to be inflexible damaging and indiscriminate and it is. it is undermining the work we need to do one or many fronts. it's increasing increasing our backlogs and eroding our workforce and differing important work. to conclude the national park service will continue to pursue new and creative ways to address its funding needs and i want to thank our many partners who are here who have come to us with these ideas and i appreciate the support of congress to resolve this extraordinary challenge. thank you. >> director jarvis thank you very much. because of the numbers of senators here i'm just going to ask one question of director jarvis to get us started and recognize my colleagues. director jarvis or decades the park service has recommended expan
defense attorney ken padowitz. thank you all for joining me. >> great to be here. >> thank you. >> joy, what is your reaction to hearing that this juror says, quote, george zimmerman got away with murder? >> you know, i think, first of all, it's finally a relief to find out that really there were no blacks on the jury. there was a matter of contention. we know now this was the juror who initially wanted to charge second-degree murder. so in her mind, this was a murder, it wasn't a killing. but you have all of these dynamics. and seema can probably talk more about this than i can. you have only six people, six women, the group think and the pressure that had to be on this juror to go all the way from second-degree murder, and as she said, to fight to the end for that idea, to have two other jurors who wanted manslaughter and three jurors who wanted to acquit when they took that first vote according to b37, the other juror. so the idea that you took three people who thought that this was a murder or at least a crime and have them converted over by the pressure that had to have been put o
claiming self-defense. >>> what anthony wiener's sexting partner wants to say to the man, his wife and what the voters say. >>> the zimmerman juror b 29 the only non-white juror on the six-member panel. the first to show her face and reveal her first name, maddi. she says she owes trayvon martin's family an apology because she ultimately had no choice but to acquit a man she calls a murderer. she spoke to robin roberts. the interview aired on abc's world news. >> what was your first -- >> my first vote was second-degree murder. >> second-degree murder. >> in between that nine hours it was hard. a lot of us had wanted to find something bad, something we could connect to the law. for myself, he's guilty. because the evidence shows he's guilty. >> he's guilty of -- >> killing trayvon martin but as the law was read to me, if you have no proof that he killed him intentionally, you can't find -- you can't say he's guilty. >> did you want to step out at all? did you want to quit? >> i was the juror that was going to give them the hung jury. i was. i fought until the end. it's hard for me to sleep.
is. that's what the defense did. that's why what the defense did was so masterful. that's why this prosecution, frankly, was abismil. >> mark was half right, better than his average. the prosecution did make a mistake -- >> just remember, jeff, you were 100% wrong all the way during this trial. so i'll give you -- >> that's not true, anyway. >> that's true, you were better than sunny was. >> thanks, thank, mark. >> the prosecution did make a big mistake in closing about not addressing the jury instructions in a more direct way, however, the fact is the evidence matters, and there was not a lot of evidence here where the prosecution could point to saying that george zimmerman committed this crime. >> i want to bring ben crump into this conversation, and benjamin, you spoke about how frustrating it's been to hear from two jurors now, who have both said basically they were confused by the jury instructions. let me play a little bit more from the juror on that. listen to this. >> i was the juror that was going to give them the hung jury. i was. i fought until the end. >> do you ha
manning's court-martial is almost over, the defense summing up today. manning, a u.s. army private, is accused of aiding the enemy by sending hundreds of thousands of top secret government documents to wikileaks. meanwhile, the prosecution blasting manning as a traitor, an anarchist. molly henneberg live in d.c. with the latest. what do we expect from the defense today, molly? >> reporter: the defense attorney said it would take about two hours to give his closing argument and that aiding the enemy charge you were just talking about, rick, it's key. it's the most serious one of the 21 charges against 25-year-old private bradley manning. and could land him in prison for life if he's convicted. the attorney said yesterday about his closing argument, quote: you're going to hear what the truth sounds like. the government has its job, but there's nobody who could believe what they said. and on the prosecution's five-plus-hourlong closing argument, he said, quote: if it takes you that long to get your point across, you know it is not true. the court-martial's happening at fort meade outs
you pay for it comes to sunscreen. up next, it was a cold-blooded murder or self-defense. another florida shooting case heads to court. this time police say man killed a teenager over loud music. details on this story right ahead. "i'm part of an american success story," "that starts with one of the world's most advanced distribution systems," "and one of the most efficient trucking networks," "with safe, experienced drivers." "we work directly with manufacturers," "eliminating costly markups," "and buy directly from local farmers in every region of the country." "when you see our low prices, remember the wheels turning behind the scenes, delivering for millions of americans, everyday. "dedication: that's the real walmart" plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day men's 50+ is a complete multivitamin designed for men's health concerns as we age. it has 7 antioxidants to support cell health. one a day men's 50+. >>> two weeks after the george zimmerman verdict, another case is making headlines. a man who shot and killed a 17-year-old in a convenience store parking lot insist
could be together. newman was charged with the murder and part of his defense centered on the claim that andrea snyderman was actively involved in planning the whole thing. she testified at newman's trial explaining why she was in florida at the time of the murder and denying any role. >> we were married in florida at a synagogue in florida. i was down there with my family. whose boss kills swunl's husband? i don't care if there were no affair. there was no affair. who kills someone else's husband? >> newman was convicted and sure enough, six months later, andrea snyderman was charged in connection with the murder of her husband. jury selection is underway right now, but in a surprise move, the prosecutors asking the judge to drop the most serious murder charge. essentially admitting they don't have the evidence to back it up. instead, she now faces a bunch of lesser charges, including lying to police and lying while on that witness stand. rusty snyderman's family very upset the murder charge was dropped since they say all along, they've been sure she played some kind of a role. mea
to publicly release. defense attorneys are set to present their closing arg umgt tomorrow. they deny that bradley manning aided the enemy because they say there is no evidence that he knew al qaeda militants ever looked at wikileaks. bradley manning did not take the stand in his own defense. >>> peter ducy is live at fort meade maryland for us. peter? >> shepard, prosecutors hammering home that this private with access to so many secrets wanted the spotlight to himself and prosecutors argue that's the process behind his decision that led him to leak 7,000 classified files. also reminding the court that just before his death, osama bin laden was seeking manning's leaked files and say since manning was such a talented analyst, he knew that was a possibility. saying, quote, this act resulted in unfettered access to enemies of the united states. an outcome all too clear to him because of his training. the defense has argued all along that manning took great care not to leak any documents that could harm the united states. his defense team will begin closing argument tomorrow morning at 9
in the korean war. we expect that defense secretary chuck hagel is also going to be attending and participating in this. you are listening to "taps." honoring those that served in the war and the president will go ahead and lay a wreath. that wreath laying ceremony. listen. ♪ we will go back when he hear the president making those remarks. a touching moment there. >> beautiful to hear that. >>> let's talk about edward snowden. new developments in the case of the nsa leaker. edward snowden will not face the death penalty. he won't be tortured. that is about all the u.s. is promising, however, as it is going to try to persuade russia to hand over the notorious nsa leaker. we heard from attorney general eric holder. he wrote a letter saying earlier in the week the charges he faces do not carry that possibility. the united states would not seek the death penalty even if mr. snowden were charged with additional death penalty eligible crimes. >> jill dougherties that latest in the efforts to get snowden back to the united states. >> family, home in paradise. i lived in great comfort. >> reporter: t
. despite the lingering hostility with north korea, secretary of defense chuck hagel. >> they showed the world that different people and different nations can accomplish many, many good things for the world when we work together. >> reporter: i'm christina multi. >> 26-year-old corp. ram matt bradford lost both his legs and eye sight in an explosion in iraq. today the family of five got the keys to their new home in nicklasville. the five-bedroom, five bathroom house was custom built by the helping hero program and rad ford says the one-level home will make life easier. >> to get on the floor and chase her around now she is walk and just a lot of things that we haven't been able to experience as a family we'll finally get to experience. >> the home is equipped with ramp and white hallways to accommodate wheelchairs and bradford continues to serve in the marine's wounded warrior battalion. >>> the burning man festival is about to get more crowded. the bureau of land managements had issued the organizers a four-year permit. last year attendance at festival was more than 53,000. auth
commissioned by the then secretary of defense robert mcnamara. basically put together for him in the late 1960's to sort of answer the question, how did we become involved in the war in vietnam. one could say maybe we should have asked those questions before we became involved with the war in vietnam. put together a lot of scholars to write this summary, starting in 1945 right after world war ii how of the u.s. gradually and then with ever greater speed became involved in the war in vietnam. and this at a time when the war was not going well trying to get out of it. very, very difficult. and when i was retained in 1971, when the new york times was provided with a copy of all but three volumes of what became known as the pentagon papers by confidence as sources, the government had advised the terms that if they publish this and it was all classified as top secret that the government would take steps, the government would go to court to get a court order barring the * from doing so. that is sort of the background of the case. every document in all these volumes was classified as top secret which
of defense procures weapons systems, a system that is to a large degree broken, unfortunately. it is now even more important with defense funding likely to be restrained to reduce funding in the coming years, our legislators overseeing major defense acquisition programs to make sure they're efficient and effectsive is as important today as it's ever been. indeed, even more so. a recently released government accountability office, g.a.o., report that is highly critical of the navy's literal combat ship program brings me to the floor today. on that program, the navy plans to spend over $40 billion to buy a total of 52 sea frames and 64 so-called plug-and-play mission modules. these are modules that would be moved on and off depending on the mission that the literal combat ship is engaged in. the combined capability of those modules with the sea frames is supposed to give thee ships their intended lethality. until recently, my main concern with this program has been the unbridled growth to the cost to build the sea frames of the lead ship. the lead ship called the freedom, the steel-hulled versi
. kristen welker, nbc news, washington. >>> tomorrow in boston, it's the defense's turn in the whitey bulger trial to make its case after the prosecution rested on friday. the trial has so far been filled with graphic testimony with a witness list that reads like a movie script. here's nbc's michelle franzen. >> reporter: james "whitey" bulger is on trial for the mob-style killings of 19 people and extorting millions of dollars from victims during the '70s and '80s. the prosecution presented 63 witnesses in 30 days. victims, drug dealers and hit men who are serving time for murder and plea deals. >> the defense is going to argue there are serious credibility problems in the key prosecution witnesses that these are people who had an ax to grind. >> reporter: dramatic testimony from close associates like bulger's longtime partner, steven "the rifleman" fleming and john "the executioner" marta lato. this is the nephew of one of the murder victims and a witness who was never called to testify and was found dead in a tony city suburb. davis suspects foul play. do you think he was murdered? >> me?
not require intent. and she never addresses self-defense. that was such a focal point in the case, not only for the defense, also for the prosecution. they had the burden to prove beyond a reasonable doubt there was not self-defense. >> lisa, what do you think? >> i think there's no question that george zimmerman shot trayvon martin intention ally. he according to his own statements pulled out the gun and shot the gun intentionally. it's so disturbing to hear a juror speak after the fact that perhaps she should have held out when she had every opportunity in the jury room to voice how she felt and stand her ground and ultimately she chose not to. >> she's chose not to. mash, go ahead. when you heard this woman explain her rational, what did you think? >> the parties that i'm extracting from it i want to compliment about. trials are not moral try b-- tribunals in the united states. it happens every day in american jurisprudence. people may be everything from child molesters to murderers and robbers and everything in between but you have to apply the fact, you have to apply the evidence to th
to that part and could face up to 20 years in prison for that. in terms of aiding the enemy, the defense argues that bradley manning, of course, was a whistle-blower, according to the defense, that he was trying to reveal abuses and crimes actually committed by the u.s. military in the wars in both iraq and afghanistan. legal experts say the prosecution may have a hard time proving aiding the enemy in this case because you have to prove intent and although some of these documents ended up in the hands of former al qaeda leader osama bin laden no evidence whatsoever, none presented during the trial, that bradley manning knew that those documents would end up in his hands. in fact, one legal expert, military legal expert told us the only case he remembers was back in the civil war where a union soldier was charged with aiding the enemy when he leaked the position of union troops to a newspaper in alexandria, virginia. >>> all workers have been accounted for after explosions rocked a propane plant in florida overnight. eight people taken to the hospital and no word on what ignited the explosions.
was so obvious there was no defense to. it and if he is sentenced to the maximum, he is facing 20 years. he kept a slight credit because he was abused in the pre- trial confinement and gave hymn credit for a couple hundred days. we start with 20 years and then get to serious charges. here is significance. bradley manning argues he didn't reveal them to the enemy but the woky leaks and under supreme court law wikileaks can't be published because if they are a journalistic entitties, then the person who gives it to the journalist and the journalist who reveals it, the person who gives it cannot be prosecuted for what the journalist did. the judge may push the law in one direction or another. we haven't sewn a case like this. norm willy the charge is against the journalist and here it is against the person who gave it to journalist. >> kathryn harris might have news for us. >> with an explanation. >> yeah, we just had information that came out of the courtroom by that information center and what we are told that on the first count, the most source count bradley manning was found not guilty
charge. he was found not guilty of aiding the enemy. cully stimson, former secretary of defense tore detainees and legal fellow with the heritage foundation and mike barrett, former intelligence officer for the office of the secretary of defense. thank you for joining us. >> thank you. >> thanks for having us. heather: why not guilty for aiding and abetting the enemy? i will start with you, cully. >> heather to, prove aiding the enemy under the statute the government had to prove one, knowingly provided intelligence to the enemy. the enemy is al qaeda an the taliban and two he did so knowingly. so there was a double burden. the judge had to be firmly convinced that was the case and clearly they didn't prove their case. one thing if he provided directly to al qaeda or taliban and posted to one of their websites. imagine this, if he gave the same information to "washington post" and guardian, and published some of it would he be charged with aiding the enemy? i doubt it. so there was a failure of proof. heather: mike, can you compare wikileaks to "washington post" and "the guardian"? >
whitey bulger. the defense will open its case on monday. jim armstrong has the story. >> reporter: the government ended its case on two powerful witnesses, one, what was known as massive money laundering and the other an irs agent who arrested him. he co--owned a bank account with his brother that was used to collect on big south boston debt long after whitey went on the run. after that jurors got to see everything pulled out of bulger's apartment turned hideout in santa monica california. more than $822,000 in cash hidden in walls alongside 30 pistols, rifles and other weapons. the witness testified he screamed and swore when arrested but eventually calmed down and told katherine to say, yes and, they're going get it. he used his real name joking quote, this is the first time i've signed this name in a long time. when agent gary hola asked if he would have ever used this arsenal to engage in a shoot-out with police, he said no because a stray bullet might hit someone. it was a powerful day of testimony and images but some are not confident of a conviction
that's been problematic from the case is the defense defines george zimmerman in a way that was helpful to his defense, but i don't think they feel as though their son has been well defined and sort of who he was. >> reporter: the back and forth over the martin case went to new heights after president obama himself weighed in with a deeply personal speech. >> when trayvon martin was first shot, i said that this could have been my son. another way of saying that is trayvon martin could have been me 35 years ago. >> all eyes are on the attorney general eric holder. the obama constituency wants to know whether they'll take any further steps in the case. >> by allowing and perhaps encouraging violent situations to escalate in public, such laws undermine public safety. the list of results tragedies is long and unfortunately has victimized too many who are innocent. it is our collective obligation. we must stand our ground. >> the martin family has started a foundation to honor trayvon's memory and to push for changes. >> we're here today to see what we can do to stop this from happening to y
of the defense spending bill. is live at journal" 7:00 a.m. several leather vents to tell about today. beginning with the politico for mommy health insurance exchanges. that is on c-span2 after 8:00 a.m. eastern. on c-span3, the senate homeland security considers the nomination of the director of u.s. citizenship and immigration services. later on c-span3, a senate energy and national -- natural resources subcommittee holds meeting on water infrastructure. that is that's 2:30 p.m. eastern. >> i think that the korean war in a sense sort of helped the -- unify themselves in a way that was not there before. when the communists came down, they were brutal. a lot of the south koreans turned against the communists in the north. that sort of solidified their sense of national cohesion and identity. but i think they meant scapula because having waited, it is for a possible that the south probably would have disintegrated on its own. >> six years after north korean troops crossed the 30th parallel, sheila miyoshi jage looks at a war that never even ended. part of book tv on c-span2. a $512se has approved
. raytheon with 164 beating 1.30, and they raise the forecast and sequestration is -- >> defense, defense. northrup grumman is much better, and look at the gold standards, and northrup grumman is upgraded by merrill lynch and people were behind in the move. mcnerney said in the call that we are beginning to see the sequestration, and u.s. air talking about how sequestration hurt the airline industry, but the defense contractors and everybody was short and believed it was a laid up short, and it w wasn't. >> maybe not for now. but everybody has to believe. >> eventually. >> the defense budget over time will not rise as much as it has, and in fact, maybe go down. >> well, the government, and well telegraphed that a lot of the guys took out costs and you could see still some mergers and remember that the allies are coming, and the people who were not defending are buying stock. i know you want to be the world wide policeman. >> no, the cost of the joint strike fighter and for per plane. >> each one worth a gilead. >> yes, close to it. not quite $91 billion, but not far from it. >> and they a
. >> bill: yeah, that was about whether the united states should have a robust defense overseas and intervene in places. >> exactly. >> bill: cleaned up like afghanistan. so christie is for that that's a traditional republican tradition where is paul is against it. so, some might say though this is healthy, to have this in the republican party to kind of shake it out because they are going to have a fight on their hands to defeat hillary clinton in 2006. -- 2016. >> that's right. if hillary clinton runs she will be associated with these obama policies that have given some -- a number, in fact, in the democratic party real pause. so, what's interesting about this is this is a problem that both parties are having simultaneously. i think the republicans probably need to have this out. and decide what kind of a party they want to be. >> bill: that's right. >> it looks like they are well on heir way to doing that. >> bill: brit, thank you. as the factor moves along this evening. we will report on a new bill to stop paying accused terrorist nidal hasan. jeanine pirro has some thoughts
or what the defense said. as far as whether private manning is traitor, that should not be band aided back. it has a unique stigma to it. unless someone is going to prosecute him for treason he shouldn't be labeled a traitor. i think the claim he's a whistle blower is off based. he may have had what he considers good intentions but at the end of the day it's not especially to every citizen to decide whether to share the count country's crown jewels with others. >> that raises the question. barbara, i don't know you've done a lot of reporting. 750,000 pages were handed over to wikileakss and a lot of that posted on the internet. a lot of it was classifieied secret. it waunt higher classification. based on everything you've heard, how much real damage to u.s. national security was done as a result of this? >> this has been the debate all along and continues to be the debate in the snowden case. how much damage? people will tell you that bradley manning leaked a lot of information but it was information intelligence at a point in time. something that happened in iraq. something that happened
as a whistleblower. the prosecution cited a conviction from the civil war days. the defense denied that bradley manning aided the enemy. arguing there's no evidence at all that he knew al qaeda militants ever even looked at wikileaks, and today it appears the judge agreed. bradley manning shows very little emotion, might have smiled at the end. catherine herridge is live. tell us more how this plate out in court. >> the military courthouse is about three-quarters of a mile from where i'm standing right now, and just before 1:00 eastern, about 12 minutes before that hour, private first class gradley mapping entered the courtroom and at that time, at least initially, he appeared fairly relaxed but as the clock tick down he became understandably tense. when verdict was read, manning stood up, faced the judge directly with his arms like stove pipes at his side. showed virtually no emotion, and two dozen of his supporters were in the courtroom as public spectators, and they were silent. afterwards, those speck taters connected with the defense attorneys and there was some applause, but virtually tha
enters the sentencing phase, where the prosecution and defense will present more arguments. israel and the palestinian authority have resumed peace talks for the first time in three years. negotiators sat down for a dinner hosted by secretary of state john kerry in washington. the talks will be overseen by martin indyk who was named as the new special envoy to the middle east. we will have more on the talks after headlines. ousted egyptian president mohamed morsi has been allowed to meet with european union more than a ousted month ago. he and the muslim brotherhood have continued to call for his reinstatement after 72 people were killed on saturday after police opened fire on a brotherhood rally. we will have more from egypt from sharif abdel kouddous later in the broadcast. the fbi has rescued more than 100 victims of forced prostitution and have a numerous people. the assistant director of the fbi's criminal investigative division spoke on monday. >> sex trafficking among children remains one of the most prevalent, violent, and unconscionable crimes in the country. despite chall
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